Deafblind Awareness Week 27 June – 3 July 2021

Securitay are proud to support Deafblind Awareness Week

Deafblindness is far more common than many people realise… around 400,000 people are affected by sight and hearing loss in the UK. That’s enough to fill Wembley Stadium nearly five times!

It affects everyone differently, some might need to adjust the settings on their TV or turn up the volume on the phone, and others might need assistance dogs, canes and more formal care. There may be no physical signs of partial sight or deafness therefore it is important that we make all our staff are aware that in the course of their daily duties they may encounter someone who is partially sighted or deaf. Securitay has undertaken to provide specific “deafblindness aware” training to all frontline staff.

Share the story

This year, we are asking everyone to share the story of deafblindness. So, be aware of deafblindness, understand how to help someone who has it and to tell someone else about it, to help spread the word. The more people who understand the condition, the more we can make life a little easier for people who are affected by it. By working together, we can make a huge difference!

Visit https://deafblind.org.uk/deafblind-awareness-week for downloadable content to help you pass on the message and spread the word!

And don’t forget to use the hashtag #DeafblindAwarenessWeek in all your posts!

New SIA qualifications for our industry

Securitay welcomes the new qualifications for our industry which come into force this year.

Sia Approved Contractor

Extract from a statement from the SIA:                                                                                                                                                       

The private security industry is increasingly recognised as providing an important role in the protection of the public. This recognition brings scrutiny, and it is more important than ever that the industry maintains and improves its standards. It is crucial that all operatives have the knowledge and skills to deal with common risks in safety critical areas. A key element of our role as the regulator is to work with the industry to raise standards in private security. The new requirements will help to achieve this. The new licence-linked qualifications reflect what we have learned from extensive research, consultation, and engagement.

Richard Jennings

Deputy MD

Feedback is the heart of communication!

Welcome to my first update of the new year.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all our staff and customers for their support in 2020 and wish them and their families a healthy and happy 2021. Unfortunately the pandemic will be with us for some time yet, however it has proved a real driving force for change, and at Securitay we’ve been keen to adapt and provide customers and staff with the support they need, when they need it.
Our customer service teams in Dundee, Aberdeen and Inverness remain poised to support you with everything you need, as well as providing advice around how your existing solutions, or any other changes your business might be facing.
Our goal is to offer the best service at all levels, so if you are an existing customer or you just need advice on security feel free to get in touch and let us know how we can help.
As always, we welcome your feedback and suggestions around how we can best work together throughout this period.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.